Tim O'Rahilly Life Coaching
Twitter Thursday

Twitter Thursday #9: Tweeting Images

If a picture is worth a thousand words, then we have the ability to extend the Twitter limit of 140 characters with ease! We can add images to our tweets very easily and effectively.

There are now a large number of third-party services which allow images to be shared on Twitter. In some ways these have been superseded by Twitter’s own image sharing feature. There are, however, some good reasons to consider using a third party option to attach images to your tweets.

Flickr is a powerful image and video hosting site and only community owned by Yahoo! It’s popular with bloggers for hosting images embedded into blogs and social media.

pikchur allows you to upload pictures and videos, then shares them throughout your social network on Facebook, flickr, Twitter etc.

Twitgoo resembles twitter itself, but asks ‘What are you looking at?’ rather than ‘What’s happening?’

yfrog is a popular photo sharing site which now lets you chat with other users too!

By far the largest and most popular of the Twitter-related services is Twitpic, which grew rapidly in January 2009 after some of the earliest pictures of the Hudson River plane crash were shared on the site.

All of these sites are easy to join and easy to use, but it comes as no surprise that Twitter would want to add a photo-sharing service to its growing list of additional features.

With the web becoming more and more ‘real-time’, twitter is arguably the most important way for people to share content as it becomes available. We can of course (and many do) add links to images, webpages, blogs and YouTube videos to our tweets. But Twitter has now made it very easy to add images directly to any tweet you send.

In the past couple of weeks, you may have noticed two new icons appearing underneath your tweets as you type them. One of these is a camera symbol.

Note the new camera icon in the lower left-hand corner!

Simply click this and browse the files on your computer for the image you wish to add. Double click on the image and a thumbnail will appear under your message. Once you’ve added the image, the character count to the left of the Tweet button will update to allow for the number of characters used for the image’s link, which is how the image will appear to your readers once the tweet is sent.

The tweet contains 32 characters, yet Twitter is reporting that there are only 101 characters remaining.

As with all such features, the Twitter image service has its pro’s and con’s. Click on your ‘profile’ tab and you will see that all your recent images now appear as a gallery on your front page. This includes any images which you have retweeted. This can be great news if you have lots of pictures related to what you do. Share them all and they will appear to anyone looking at your profile. The downside, of course, is that if you tweet any images which go against your personal or brand values, they will now be out there for all to see.

How do you choose which images to post? You may well already know what my advice will be! F.I.R.E  your images! Are they Fun, Interesting, Relevant or displaying your Expertise? Then share away.

As with all these features, go play around with image sharing and have fun!

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